How to Remove a Popcorn or Textured Ceiling

Any homeowner would agree that with owning your home there will always a "project" list. Being that spring is a time of renewal it's a great time to tackle some of those projects! So let's get started.....

As a Realtor I show a lot of homes to a lot of clients and one thing that resonates with many, regardless of their choice in homes or personal style, is that they HATE popcorn ceilings. Popcorn ceilings were a popular design trend during the 1960's and 70's, but they look dated compared to today's clean, modern décor. Removing the textured material is a fairly straightforward job, but it can be messy and requires a bit of time. Proper preparation will make the job go smoother. Although it may seem like a daunting job to remove them, once you're determined that it's going to happen it really isn't that bad and you'll love the fresh, updated look of the room once you're done.

Of course the easiest way to get rid of popcorn ceilings is to simply install a new drywall ceiling over the popcorn. You would lose about 1 inch of ceiling height, but this might be the most hassle-free way of getting rid of that popcorn. To compensate for the difference in height where the new drywall ceiling meets the wall, consider installing crown molding to finish off the new look.

If the popcorn was added before 1979, get it tested for asbestos by either wetting down a small area with a sponge and scraping off a little to place in a small bag and taking it to a lab for testing. The Environmental protection Agency has local testing services nationwide, which you can find buy consulting their website. You can also find a home testing kit from hardware and building supply stores. If your ceiling does contain asbestos, you might opt to cover it with new drywall or have a professional remove it, as asbestos is a known carcinogen. Check local regulations for guidelines on removal. If it's determined that there is no asbestos then proceed with the step-by-step DIY removal as outlined below.

GATHER MATERIALS:

  • Plastic sheets              
  • Step ladder
  • Spray bottle or garden sprayer
  • Putty knife
  • 120-grit sandpaper
  • a drywall blade
  • a paint scraper
  • a spray gun or garden sprayer
  • a pole sander
  • 120-grit sandpaper.


  • Read more : http://www.ehow.com/how_2254543_remove-popcorn-ceilings.html

  • a drywall blade
  • a paint scraper
  • a spray gun or garden sprayer
  • a pole sander
  • 120-grit sandpaper.


  • Read more : http://www.ehow.com/how_2254543_remove-popcorn-ceilings.html

    STEP ONE: Clear the Room

    Remove all the furniture in the room if possible, or cover it with waterproof plastic sheets. Spread plastic sheets or tarps on the floor to protect it. Consider putting a piece of plastic over the windows as well.

    STEP TWO: Wet the Ceiling

    Put on a long-sleeved shirt, a hat, and goggles. Use a spray bottle or a clean garden sprayer to moisten an area of 2 to 3-square-feet with plain water. Alternatively, use a long nap ceiling paint roller dipped in water. The objective is to wet the popcorn enough to soften it and make it easy to scrape off without soaking the sheetrock behind it. Work in an area about 5 feet square. It’s better to make several passes than allow the popcorn ceiling to absorb too much water which could damage the paper surface and the wallboards underneath.

    STEP THREE: Scrape the Popcorn

    Wait 10-15 minutes for the water to soak in and then start scraping it off. Use an 8 or 10-inch putty knife to carefully scrape the popcorn off the ceiling. Use a smaller putty knife to scrape the corners and the crown molding. Move across the ceiling, section by section, moistening and scraping until all the popcorn is gone. Try not to catch the corners of the putty knife. This can create gouges in the ceiling that need to be repaired later.

    STEP FOUR: Sand the Ceiling

    Once the popcorn has been removed, repair any damaged areas with spackle and let dry. Sand the ceiling lightly with 120-grit sandpaper.

    Sand the ceiling smooth with 120-grit sandpaper

    Read more : http://www.ehow.com/how_2254543_remove-popcorn-ceilings.html

    Sand the ceiling smooth with 120-grit sandpaper

    Read more : http://www.ehow.com/how_2254543_remove-popcorn-ceilings.html

    STEP FIVE: Paint the Ceiling

    Once the ceiling has dried completely from the water and any repairs you had to make it's time to paint the ceiling. Apply a coat of PVA primer and finish it off with a coat of ceiling paint.

    STEP SIX: Pat Yourself on the Back

    Clean up the plastic and tarps. Stand back and admire your work. Cross that one off of your project list! Not only do you have a great new look, bu you've just added value to your home.GREAT JOB!

    The Environmental Protection Agency has local testing services nationwide, which you can find by consulting its website. You can also obtain a home testing kit from hardware and building supply outlets.

    Read more : http://www.ehow.com/how_2254543_remove-popcorn-ceilings.html
    The Environmental Protection Agency has local testing services nationwide, which you can find by consulting its website. You can also obtain a home testing kit from hardware and building supply outlets.

    Read more : http://www.ehow.com/how_2254543_remove-popcorn-ceilings.html
    The Environmental Protection Agency has local testing services nationwide, which you can find by consulting its website. You can also obtain a home testing kit from hardware and building supply outlets.

    Read more : http://www.ehow.com/how_2254543_remove-popcorn-ceilings.html
    The Environmental Protection Agency has local testing services nationwide, which you can find by consulting its website. You can also obtain a home testing kit from hardware and building supply outlets.

    Read more : http://www.ehow.com/how_2254543_remove-popcorn-ceilings.htmIf  the popcorn does contain asbestos then the recommendation would be to install new drywall right over it. If that's not possible consult with a professional to have it removed.
    Jaymie Denny

    Jaymie Denny

    Licensed Real Estate Salesperson
    Contact Me

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